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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 34  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 483-488

Flooding adds pathogenic Escherichia coli strains to the water sources in southern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan


1 Department of Microbiology, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan; Department of Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA
2 Department of Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA
3 Department of Microbiology, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan

Correspondence Address:
F Hasan
Department of Microbiology, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad
Pakistan
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0255-0857.195350

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Purpose: Seasonal rains in Pakistan result in heavy floods across the country, whereby faecal contaminants will be added to the water bodies and cause numerous food-borne outbreaks. The present study was aimed to determine the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains in the water sources. Materials and Methods: Two hundred water samples collected during (2011–2012) were processed for the isolation of E. coli (EC) strains. EC strains were further analysed for antibiotic susceptibility patterns, and pathogroups-specific virulence factors stx1, stx2, stx2c, eae, tir, hlyA, bfpA, estA and eltA were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Results: Thirty-three percent of the water samples were contaminated with EC pathotypes. Fifty percent (33/66) of the DEC pathotypes were identified as enterotoxigenic EC (ETEC). Seventy-two percent (13/18) of the enteropathogenic EC (EPEC) strains were identified as typical EPEC and 28% (5/18) as atypical EPEC. Eleven percent (7/66) of the Shiga toxin EC (STEC) isolates carried a combination of stx1 and stx2 genes. Summer was found as a peak season with 47% (31/66) for EC pathogroups' activities. Eighty-nine percent of the strains showed resistance against tetracycline. Conclusion: ETEC and EPEC are the primary causes of water contamination in southern regions of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan. Firm adherence to the prescribed drugs can decrease trends in antibiotic resistance.






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2004 - Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology
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